Koinonikon of Great Saturday by D. Foteinos

Shota

Παλαιό Μέλος
#1
The most popular (?) Greek composition of the Koinonikon of the Great Saturday "The Lord awoke as one that sleeps" is the one by Petros Lampadarios. Classical Greek anthologies also contain another Koinonikon by George the Cretan. What is less known (or almost unknown?) is the Koinonikon by Dionysios Foteinos. Here is its Romanian adaptation:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gKRjQwXv3dI

It is somewhat shorter than Petros' composition, while being musically more interesting than the one by Kretos, with ancient and more modern flavour at the same time.
 

Shota

Παλαιό Μέλος
#2
For completeness I attach a live Romanian recording of Kretos' Koinonikon, which I found on youtube. I'm not aware of a Greek recording (those who chant classical koinonika, seem to prefer Petros' composition).
 

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#5
What is less known (or almost unknown?) is the Koinonikon by Dionysios Foteinos. Here is its Romanian adaptation:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gKRjQwXv3dI

It is somewhat shorter than Petros' composition, while being musically more interesting than the one by Kretos, with ancient and more modern flavour at the same time.
About Foteinos' (Greek) Koinonikon I'm not sure it has been transcribed into the New Method.
Do you happen to have this Koinonikon in the Old Notation? Or do you happen to have the Romanian adaptation? I'm curious how you know that this a Koinonikon by Dionysios Foteinos. Of course, I'm not questioning whether it is in fact his composition. I'm just curious how you know this since there is no composition in the New Method and the youtube video doesn't seem to mention the composer.

Hopefully we could get a score in the New Method because it is such an excellent piece and the choir chanted it so skillfully.

Thanks for sharing.

 

Shota

Παλαιό Μέλος
#6
Do you happen to have this Koinonikon in the Old Notation? Or do you happen to have the Romanian adaptation? I'm curious how you know that this a Koinonikon by Dionysios Foteinos. Of course, I'm not questioning whether it is in fact his composition. I'm just curious how you know this since there is no composition in the New Method and the youtube video doesn't seem to mention the composer.

Hopefully we could get a score in the New Method because it is such an excellent piece and the choir chanted it so skillfully.

Thanks for sharing.

I presume there are mss in the Old Notation with the piece. I don't know whether Anton Pann transcribed the Greek original in the New Method, but he published its Romanian adaptation.
 

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#7
I presume there are mss in the Old Notation with the piece. I don't know whether Anton Pann transcribed the Greek original in the New Method, but he published its Romanian adaptation.
Thank you for the score Shota. Such a different experience to follow the score while hearing the piece, as opposed to simply hearing the piece without the score. I especially appreciated how the choir shifted the ison to ZW from the very beginning of the long musical phrase instead of simply shifting to ZW at the very end.

Funny how circuitous the route this musical composition is taking here. We are virtually rediscovering it through a process of reverse engineering from the Romanian adaptation. Composed originally in the Old Notation in Greek, possibly transcribed into the New Notation in Greek, adapted to Romanian use in the New Notation by Anton Pann (according to this source, Anton Pann was a student of Dionysios Foteinos), and now we're hopefully headed to the Greek composition.

"Εξηγέρθη ως ο υπνών Κύριος και Ανέστη, σώζων ημας. Αλληλούϊα"

"The Lord arose as one out of sleep, and rising He saves us. Alleluia."
(as translated by Nomikos Michael Vaporis published by Holy Cross Orthodox Press)

 
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