Koinonika in English

frephraim

Παλαιό Μέλος
#2
Dear Samuel,

I am delighted to see that other people besides myself are finding practical applications for my compilation of papadic formulae.

As for your composition, it looks fine to me for the most part, although I noticed a few minor things that could be improved:

1. In the first line, the combination of oligon and kentemata above the word "of" should not be written as a combination since they are followed by an ascending note. So they should be written as an oligon followed by kentemata.

2. The unwritten rule in Greek for using those "n" symbols is that the one that looks sort of like a question mark with a dot missing is used when followed by any vowel except epsilon. To write an "n" symbol followed by an epsilon, the other "n" symbol is used, which looks sort of like an upside-down Greek "eta". So you need to switch the "n" symbols in lines 3, 4, and 7.

3. I'm not sure if this is a problem or not, but it seems to me that the word "the" in line 1 is held for too many notes, considering that it is an unimportant syllable.

4. The word "Body" should be hyphenated after the "d" rather than before it.

5. There is an extra "L" in the word "immortality."

6. Another thing I'm not certain about is whether the repetition of the word "Body" was done correctly. When a phrase is repeated in Greek papadic hymns, the way it is done is almost always as follows: The entire phrase (except the last syllable and the consonant at the end of the second to last syllable) is chanted, and then the phrase is chanted in its entirety. So this means that if the phrase is "of the Body of Christ", the most likely way Greek composers would repeat it would be by chanting: "of the Body o[f], of the Body of Christ". The "f" is in brackets because it is not sung the first time around.

Nevertheless, perhaps your way of repeating the phrase is permissible, because the way I just described above is not applied 100% of the time. Maybe someone else more knowledgeable can tell us more details about the rules for repeating a phrase.

+Fr. Ephraim
 

frephraim

Παλαιό Μέλος
#3
One other comment I have about your composition is the way you have omitted the final consonant before a repetition. Although I agree that such consonants should be omitted, I disagree with the way the omission has been written.

In line 6, you wrote the first syllable of "fountain" as "fou". The problem with this is that a singer either needs to know the text by heart or look two lines ahead in order to know how to pronounce it. In Greek, you can get away with simply dropping the final consonant, since the pronunciation of vowels in Greek does not depend on what consonants follow it. But the pronunciation of English vowels does depend on what consonants follow.

To remedy this situation, I suggest that instead of writing "fou - - -", write "fou[n] - - -".

By the way, I have just begun a new thread regarding conventions for writing lyrics in English here at the Psaltologion at: http://psaltologion.com/showthread.php?t=5208 in which I present a little article I have written about this issue.
 

basil

Παλαιό Μέλος
#4
This is excellent work, Sam.

1. In line 1, the gorgon should be beneath the elaphron rather than above it.

2. I would agree with Papa Ephraim that the word "the" in line 1 is held for too many notes.

3. In line 1, there should be a 3-beat measure and barline at the end of the syllable "-take."

4. I noticed in line 1 that you used the 0X formula on page 7 of the formula list. But I also noticed that there are many 010 formulas on pages 15 and 16 which would also work. If you haven't looked at these already, they are worth considering as well.

5. Like Papa Ephraim, I am concerned about the use of repetition. I am not experienced regarding the rules for repetition in Greek, so I would like to hear from an expert about those rules. But my intuition tells me that your repetitions are missing context. For instance, your first repetition: "Body, Body" seems wrong because the word "Body" was preceded by a limiting adjective and a preposition, which are both associated with it (that is, if you were to diagram the sentence, they would be on the same horizontal line). So in my opinion, the repetition should be: "Body, the Body" or "Body, of the Body." Now let's look at your second repetition: "fountain, taste the fountain." This seems to have too much context, since you are repeating a verb ("taste") which is unrelated to the other repeated group of words ("the fountain"). In this case, I would only repeat as follows: "fountain, the fountain." In general, my instinct tells me that all repeated syllables should be on roughly the same "level" grammatically.

6. My final comment is purely aesthetic. When there is only one hyphen (as in the word "Par-take") it should be centered between the two syllables. But when there are multiple hyphens, there should be an even amount of spacing between each hyphen, as well as a smaller (but still identical) amount of space before the first hyphen and after the last hyphen. For example, "Bo - - - - dy." Also, by the canons of page construction, the bottom margin should always be larger than the top margin. [Splitting hairs: I like to put a thin space between the last letter of a lyric and the first underscore of the word extension. And strictly speaking, an underscore is too low below the base of the line to be a word extension, but there is no easy way to raise the position of the underscore in a word processing program.]
 

basil

Παλαιό Μέλος
#5
For example, "Bo - - - - dy."
Apparently this forum system does not convert multiple consecutive spaces into nonbreaking spaces. To see what I really mean, "View Source," or use the "Reply and Quote" feature to see this sentence as I originally typed it.
 

frephraim

Παλαιό Μέλος
#6
1. In line 1, the gorgon should be beneath the elaphron rather than above it.
Even though I state in my rules of orthography (rule #50) that the gorgon is usually written below a lone apostrophos (when not preceded by anything else that would put the apostrophos above it), it seems that this rule I invented is not absolute. Occasionally I see the gorgon written above a lone apostrophos for no apparent reason, even in books with trustworthy orthography. Are these exceptions due to the carelessness of the book's typesetter, or is there no such rule? I don't know. Maybe it's not a real rule after all, since I have even seen this "error" even in manuscripts, such as the one I have attached to this message. Since I'm not sure, I carefully worded rule #50 to say that the gorgon "is usually placed below single symbols."
 

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#7
Thank you all for the corrections. I plan a rewrite of the piece. I have thought for a day or two on your comments and do have a few points of my own.

The emphasis on "the" is because that was just how the formula is. Any non-emphasized syllable would fall there and seem out of place. If it were a long word, it would also seem weird a non-emphasized syllable is getting more "attention" melodically than the emphasized syllable.

In my observations, it seems many composers (specifically Petros Lampadarios, who is the one composer whose papadic pieces I have worked with, emulated, and studied the most) are fine with holding a non-emphasized syllable out. However, while reflecting on your comments, I came to the conclusion that the composer should make a judgment call on what non-emphasized syllables should receive emphasis. I looked through a few pieces of Petros Lampadarios, and while he will hold out long phrases on non-emphasized syllables, he never does so on a word like "kai". I did not make a good judgment call placing "the" as the unemphasized syllable in this specific formula.

You both are correct on the repetition of "Body". I did it to work with the formulas, I did not consider how I was repeating and how it should be done with the words.

Papa Ephraim, I agree with your analysis on the word "fountain", with the first part before the repetition of the word, I agree that adding the "n" in parenthesis is the best way to show how to pronounce the vowel before the repetition kicks in.

Basil, on "taste the fountain", I just wrote it exactly as the formula says, and personally I think it worked out quite nicely having the whole phrase "taste the fountain" repeat.

I plan to completely re-write this piece. It was somewhat of an experiment with Papa Ephraim's formulas, as all other papadic pieces found in English are adaptations. I played around with trying to adapt a few Soma Christou pieces, but they weren't as easy to maneuver as, say, Aineite ton Kyrion is into "Praise the Lord".

As to how I began the piece with the quick apostrophos on "Par-" of "Partake", that idea I stole straight from many of the classic papadic pieces done by Petros Lampadarios and a few other composers. The beginning to almost every Aneite ton Kyrion piece in the Mousiki Pandekti of 1851 does a form of this, and many times dropping the "Ai-" in "Aineite" in pitch by 3 or 4 notes, and usually on a half beat. In other Koinonika of Petros, if there are several syllables he "rushes" through the first three or four notes with bridge or filler notes until he hits the emphasized syllable. The beginning of "Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silent" in Greek does this. I have included the "Evlogimenos Erchomenos" in Agia to show what I mean. The "Ev-lo-gi" is each one note and it starts three notes down and goes up one until the formula for the emphasized syllable, in this case "men-", is reached.

Now there are obviously plenty of examples, even from Petros, when this is not done and the first syllable of a piece is held out. This seems to be a choice of style on how to begin a piece, and I went with the one I just described above.

Thank you for your criticism and comments. They are always most helpful. If you wish, I can provide examples of the "Aineite ton Kyrion" compositions from Mousiki Pandekti 1851, but I assume both of you have already seen them and know what I describe.
 

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agrovas

Βασίλης Αγροκώστας
#9
I composed a brief Koinonikon for Pascha using Papa Ephraim's First Mode Papadic Formulas. Any other Koinonika compositions I will post here. Criticisms and comments welcome.
Well done brother!!! Keep up , you really have the talent to compose Byzantine Music!!!

:)
 

frephraim

Παλαιό Μέλος
#11
Dear Sam,

It looks fine for the most part. There were a few minor things you might consider changing:

1. I noticed that when you insert the "meaningless n" symbol, you also include the vowel that is to be chanted with it. For example: "?o" or "Uo" (That question mark should not have a dot beneath it, and that capital-U should look more like an η rotated 180 degrees.) Although writing the vowel after it does have some advantages, the serious drawback (in my opinion) is that the pronunciation of syllables ending in consonants becomes confusing. For example, near the bottom of page 1, you have: "Lord___Uo_____" My concern is that by giving the "meaningless n" its own consonant, I think some people will be more likely to forget to pronounce the "rd" at the end of this phrase.
Another drawback with trying to include the vowel after a "meaningless n" is evident when trying to insert one for the first syllable in the words "hear-ing" and "heark-en". If you write an "ea" in both cases, the chanter will have to remember to pronounce each one differently.

1. a) One other thing about the "meaningless n" is that the "U" is used before the "eh" sounds in Greek, whereas the "?" is used before all other vowels. I don't think there is any point in preserving the distinction between these two in English, so I would recommend using only one of those symbols. In my compositions, I have chosen the latter, since it is the more common version of the "meaningless n" (since it's used before all vowels except the "eh"-sounding ones).

2. Repeating the word "the" just before the word "Praise" in the second to last line on page 1 makes "praise" sound like a noun. I would delete that "the".

3. I question how well you have followed the formulaic rules in lines 3 and 4 of page 2 for the word "Heavens". I haven't codified the rules yet for papadic fourth mode, so I can't say for sure, but I have a hunch that a phrase accented on the second to last syllable should have a different formula.

4. The omalon in line 3 of page 1 needs to be shifted to the left.

5. I am not completely satisfied with the cadence you have for the word "Praise" in line 3 of page 1. Unfortunately, I can't really say why or give you any better suggestions (or even be sure that my dissatisfaction is justified) until I codify the formulas for this mode. Hopefully I'll get around to it later this year. If you don't want to wait until then, feel free to examine on your own some papadic compositions with formulas that are accented on the last syllable.

* * *​

In general, composing a papadic melody for the communion hymn "Praise the Lord from the heavens" is quite challenging because it has so few syllables (only 7). The same hymn in Greek not only has more syllables (12), but also every important word in it has no less than three syllables, which means that composers can use a regular formula for each one (if not more than one formula for each one). But there aren't really any papadic formulas for one-syllable words, so what are we to do in English???

I don't claim to have a good answer to that question (not yet, at least), but one trick that comes to mind is that since the monosyllabic word "Praise" is the first word of the hymn, I think we could cheat by using a prelude melody for it instead of a regular formula. For example, we could take the prelude melody from the μέγιστον (=huge) cherubic hymn by Gregorios in this mode (on p. 279 in Volume 4 of the 1851 Mousike Pandekte), and use it for the word "Praise".

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _​

I would like to know if anyone else has any better ideas about how to deal with this challenging problem of setting the word "Praise" to a papadic melody.
 
#12
Although writing the vowel after it does have some advantages, the serious drawback (in my opinion) is that the pronunciation of syllables ending in consonants becomes confusing. For example, near the bottom of page 1, you have: "Lord___Uo_____" My concern is that by giving the "meaningless n" its own consonant, I think some people will be more likely to forget to pronounce the "rd" at the end of this phrase.
Another drawback with trying to include the vowel after a "meaningless n" is evident when trying to insert one for the first syllable in the words "hear-ing" and "heark-en". If you write an "ea" in both cases, the chanter will have to remember to pronounce each one differently.
So are you advocating that when one includes the "U" symbol that they do not put anything after it, or that I should include the rest of the word after it brackets, or at the end of the phrase include the rest of the word in brackets?

I know this is somewhat a matter of preference, but personally I think it a good idea that we "composers" (I'm not really deserving of that title as mine are so flawed) should follow the same rules of style (such as how to break up words, when to use dashes, etc., etc.), so I would like to find a consensus on things like how to apply the "U" symbol in compositions.

1. a) One other thing about the "meaningless n" is that the "U" is used before the "eh" sounds in Greek, whereas the "?" is used before all other vowels. I don't think there is any point in preserving the distinction between these two in English, so I would recommend using only one of those symbols. In my compositions, I have chosen the latter, since it is the more common version of the "meaningless n" (since it's used before all vowels except the "eh"-sounding ones).
I'm on board with this approach.

2. Repeating the word "the" just before the word "Praise" in the second to last line on page 1 makes "praise" sound like a noun. I would delete that "the".
Will do. The reason it was included, just so you are aware, is because in the original that is where "ton" repeated. But you are right about it making Praise (especially as it is capitalized) look like a noun.

3. I question how well you have followed the formulaic rules in lines 3 and 4 of page 2 for the word "Heavens". I haven't codified the rules yet for papadic fourth mode, so I can't say for sure, but I have a hunch that a phrase accented on the second to last syllable should have a different formula.
Honestly, Father, I struggled very hard with this ending. I wanted to keep the ending, but obviously the downside to trying to adapt this Koinonikon (which you address later in your comments) is that there is very little to match up and very little to work with. The koinonikon in Greek ends on an accented syllable (ουρανών) and "Heavens" is 2nd to last. So I tried to accommodate this problem the best I could at the time. Admittedly, I didn't put a ton of thought into it. I should have.

Based on how this ending (common in many papadic pieces, look to almost any Asmatikon of the Cross) is similar and a longer, more drawn out ending that can be found in several places, I have started hunting for 2nd to last syllable emphasized phrases with this similar ending. I have found one in this Koinonikon of Petros for Palm Sunday (see attached document) with the ending phrase of the word "Evlogimenos" (End of Line 7). It goes up to high Ni with three ascending notes then holds with a klasma before ending the phrase.

The best option would seem to be to re-write the piece to use a similar approach to "Heavens" while still using the drawn out ending of the original. (Am I making sense, or should I just write out what I am saying?) Does anyone disagree with this idea?

5. I am not completely satisfied with the cadence you have for the word "Praise" in line 3 of page 1. Unfortunately, I can't really say why or give you any better suggestions (or even be sure that my dissatisfaction is justified) until I codify the formulas for this mode. Hopefully I'll get around to it later this year. If you don't want to wait until then, feel free to examine on your own some papadic compositions with formulas that are accented on the last syllable.
All I did was chop of "A-" in "Aneite" and started where the "-nei" picked up in the piece. I could not think of any other way to approach it as "praise" in my opinion, is an emphasized syllable. To be honest, I don't see the problem in this approach.

I don't claim to have a good answer to that question (not yet, at least), but one trick that comes to mind is that since the monosyllabic word "Praise" is the first word of the hymn, I think we could cheat by using a prelude melody for it instead of a regular formula. For example, we could take the prelude melody from the μέγιστον (=huge) cherubic hymn by Gregorios in this mode (on p. 279 in Volume 4 of the 1851 Mousike Pandekte), and use it for the word "Praise".
This is a very good idea, in my opinion. I will try using this approach.
 

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basil

Παλαιό Μέλος
#13
I would like to know if anyone else has any better ideas about how to deal with this challenging problem of setting the word "Praise" to a papadic melody.
In Greek, the words «Αινείτε τον Κύριον» have the pattern 010 0 100. This pattern suggests the use of two melodic cadences, one for «Αινείτε» and one for «τον Κύριον.» Thus both the words «Αινείτε» and «Κύριον» receive a significant amount of melodic emphasis in Greek compositions.

In English, the words "Praise the Lord" have the pattern 101. This pattern suggests the use of a single melodic cadence. For example, if we were composing a sticheraric melody, we could probably use a 100 formula for any 101 pattern. The reason is that in sticheraric 100 formulae, the last syllable is usually held for two beats and begins on a downbeat; therefore, it receives enough "natural" emphasis to be appropriate for an accented syllable. By this logic, it is appropriate to use a 100 formula for the words "Praise the Lord" in a papadic communion hymn. And this is indeed the approach John Michael Boyer took in his adaptation of the first mode communion hymn by Ioannis Koukouzelis (which I have attached to this post). One advantage to this approach is that it satisfies the formulaic rules. Another advantage is that there are many examples of 100 formulae in Greek which can be used. A disadvantage to this approach is that the word "Lord" receives merely "natural" emphasis (by virtue of being the last syllable of a 100 formula). While this is acceptable (and formulaically valid), it would be preferable for that word to receive deliberate emphasis that matches the emphasis given to the first syllable "Praise." For example, in the attached adaptation by John Michael Boyer, the word "Lord" receives only 4 beats on one note. Every other word in the hymn receives more notes and more beats, including the words "the" and "from"!

In cases like these where the syllabic pattern in Greek differs so drastically from the syllable pattern in English, I try to look for inspiration in the works of composers of Byzantine music in other non-Greek languages. Mitri el-Murr composed about 80 pages of original cherubic hymns and communion hymns in Arabic in his 1955 publication El-Qithara el-Rouhiyyat. I looked through the 8 communion hymns he composed in Arabic. The Arabic text is pronounced with the four syllables "Sab-bi-hur-rab." This is the combination of the word "Sab-bi-hu" ("Praise") and "r-rab" ("the Lord"). So in Arabic we have the same problem that we do in English; namely, the word "Lord" is only one syllable. Mitri el-Murr took two approaches. For the first, second, fourth, fifth, sixth, and grave modes, he wrote an extended melody for the first or first three syllables ("Sab" or "Sab-bi-hu") followed by a brief melody for "Sab-bi-hu." Then he wrote an extended melody for the word "rab" (usually prefacing this with a 1-beat "r" syllable for linguistic purposes), followed by a brief melody for the syllables "Sab-bi-hur-rab." But for the third and plagal fourth modes, he wrote an extended melody for "Sab-bi-hu" followed by a brief melody for "Sab-bi-hu," then an extended melody for "r-rab" (during which "r-rab" is repeated four times in third mode and twice in plagal fourth mode). From the former approach, we can see that el-Murr thought it important to deliberately emphasise both the words "Praise" and "Lord" and that in general he liked to use an extended cadence followed by a brief cadence for each important word. While it was easy to do this for the word "Sab-bi-hu," it was hard to do this for "r-rab" because (as has been observed in this thread) there are no medial cadences for a one-syllable accented word. El-Murr compromised by going back and repeating "Sab-bi-hur-rab," usually with a 1001 formula. The advantage to this approach is that the words "Praise" and "Lord" both receive deliberate emphasis. But I suspect that his manner of repeating syllables may be unprecedented. I don't have enough experience with syllable repetition in Greek to know for sure.

I for one am interested in finding a formulaically valid solution that allows for the deliberate emphasis of both "Praise" and "Lord." Papa Ephraim has suggested that perhaps we could use a prelude melody for "Praise." I dislike this option because after hearing an extended prelude melody, I expect to hear the same phrase repeated with a briefer melody. If this doesn't happen, I feel that the composition would be structurally awkward (in the same way that it would be awkward if you were to watch a film where someone says "Without further adieu..." and then the camera jumps straight to the middle of a storyline). Furthermore, the periodic repetition of syllables (especially after an extended cadence such as a prelude melody) assists the congregation with comprehension.

The first proposition that comes to my mind is to revert to the King James translation "Praise ye the Lord from the heavens." Although people these days tend to frown upon this reading in favor of HTM's more concise "Praise the Lord," we are desperate here and every syllable counts. The words "Praise ye the Lord" have the pattern 1001. Perhaps we could use two melodic cadences, one for "Praise ye" (10) and one for "the Lord" (01). Unlike the case of the one-syllable "Praise," we should have an adequate selection of 10 formulae for "Praise ye." In fact, if we are able to adjust a Greek melody for «Αινείτε» (010) by removing the first syllable, we might even be able to use the original melody from the Greek, which would be great. And we are free to use a one-syllable prelude melody without affecting the structure of the composition. So far, I don't see any disadvantages. But then we would have to find a melody for "the Lord" (01), in which case we run into the same problem faced by Mitri el-Murr; namely, there aren't really medial cadences for a one-syllable accented word. If we were to "borrow" his solution in English, we could use an extended melody for "Lord" and then repeat the words "Praise ye the Lord." As I mentioned above, I don't have enough experience with syllable repetition in Greek to know if this is valid, but it seems more reasonable to me than the alternatives.
 

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#14
I for one am interested in finding a formulaically valid solution that allows for the deliberate emphasis of both "Praise" and "Lord." Papa Ephraim has suggested that perhaps we could use a prelude melody for "Praise." I dislike this option because after hearing an extended prelude melody, I expect to hear the same phrase repeated with a briefer melody. If this doesn't happen, I feel that the composition would be structurally awkward (in the same way that it would be awkward if you were to watch a film where someone says "Without further adieu..." and then the camera jumps straight to the middle of a storyline). Furthermore, the periodic repetition of syllables (especially after an extended cadence such as a prelude melody) assists the congregation with comprehension.
A possible advantage of using a prelude on "Praise" is that it would be more acceptable to use a 001 formula to kick into a long, deliberate "Lord"? It seems to me this is a fair time to use an unaccented melody on an accented word if a Prelude formula has preceded the use of a 001 formula. Agree/disagree?
 

basil

Παλαιό Μέλος
#15
A possible advantage of using a prelude on "Praise" is that it would be more acceptable to use a 001 formula to kick into a long, deliberate "Lord"? It seems to me this is a fair time to use an unaccented melody on an accented word if a Prelude formula has preceded the use of a 001 formula. Agree/disagree?
I find this solution formulaically valid, although some 001 formulae might be more appropriate for this purpose than others. For example, in the papadic formulae for first mode that Papa Ephraim codified, some of the 001 formulae have a last syllable that is only held for 6 beats. Some, however, are held for 10 beats, which is better. Even in the best case, I doubt that "Lord" will have the same degree of emphasis as "Praise," but in the end that isn't so bad.
 

frephraim

Παλαιό Μέλος
#16
So are you advocating that when one includes the "U" symbol that they do not put anything after it, or that I should include the rest of the word after it brackets, or at the end of the phrase include the rest of the word in brackets?
I think it is best to use a symbol for the "meaningless n" without anything after it.

The best option would seem to be to re-write the piece to use a similar approach to "Heavens" while still using the drawn out ending of the original. (Am I making sense, or should I just write out what I am saying?)
Yes, I think that will work fine, but I'd like to see it, just to make sure I get what you're saying.

All I did was chop of "A-" in "Aneite" and started where the "-nei" picked up in the piece. I could not think of any other way to approach it as "praise" in my opinion, is an emphasized syllable. To be honest, I don't see the problem in this approach.
If you had only chopped off the "Ai-" of "Ai-nei-te" and then replaced the remaining two syllables of the word with two English syllables (e.g., using Basil's nice idea: "Praise ye"), this approach would be fine. But the problem is that you only had one syllable in English ("Praise") to fill the space taken by two syllables in the Greek original. As a result, you were forced to chop off the end of the Greek melody at a place that sort of sounds like a cadence, but I'm not so sure that it really is a valid cadence. But as I said, I can't say for sure until I start codifying the formulas for this papadic mode.
 

frephraim

Παλαιό Μέλος
#17
El-Murr compromised by going back and repeating "Sab-bi-hur-rab," usually with a 1001 formula... But I suspect that his manner of repeating syllables may be unprecedented. I don't have enough experience with syllable repetition in Greek to know for sure.
I'm having a hard time visualizing what this would look like. It would be great if you could post an example of this for us to see.

Papa Ephraim has suggested that perhaps we could use a prelude melody for "Praise." I dislike this option because after hearing an extended prelude melody, I expect to hear the same phrase repeated with a briefer melody.
Good point. But what if we were to use a prelude melody for "Praise", followed by a 001 melody for "Praise the Lord"?

The first proposition that comes to my mind is to revert to the King James translation "Praise ye the Lord from the heavens."
I think this is a great idea.

If we were to "borrow" his [Mitri el-Murr's] solution in English, we could use an extended melody for "Lord" and then repeat the words "Praise ye the Lord." As I mentioned above, I don't have enough experience with syllable repetition in Greek to know if this is valid, but it seems more reasonable to me than the alternatives.
This sounds promising, but I would still like to see an example of how it would work in practice.
 
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frephraim

Παλαιό Μέλος
#18
A possible advantage of using a prelude on "Praise" is that it would be more acceptable to use a 001 formula to kick into a long, deliberate "Lord"? It seems to me this is a fair time to use an unaccented melody on an accented word if a Prelude formula has preceded the use of a 001 formula. Agree/disagree?
I think this would probably work well.
 

frephraim

Παλαιό Μέλος
#19
...in the papadic formulae for first mode that Papa Ephraim codified...
By the way, that compilation of papadic formulae for first mode is much larger now because I have included several formulae from Slavonic adaptations of Greek cherubic hymns as well as from unpublished manuscripts of transcriptions from the old notation. You can download this newer version now from our papadic formulae webpage, but it still isn't finished yet because I am about to include some formulae from Romanian cherubic hymns. I've had to make the "Key" more complicated to account for those non-Greek adaptations.

I'm considering also including Mitri el-Murr's formulae and other Arabic formulae, but I've never seen them and I don't know how traditional they are. Any suggestions?
 
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