Maqam Huzam

Dimitri

Δημήτρης Κουμπαρούλης, Administrator
Staff member
#2
Very interesting Basil, thanks. I didn't know such practice (rotating maqam) was still in use in the particular Jewish tradition. Their 10-mode rotating schedule reminds of the 8-mode rotating schedule of Orthodox churches using Byzantine chant. Also note the parts where everybody joins in at some cadences similar to what happened (and still happens occasionally) in some of the above mentioned churches (remember the Patriarchate and the kids joining in at the cadences). Interesting that there is no isokratema (drone). The style is also familiar to Byzantine psaltai although there are some distinctive differences.
 

Shota

Παλαιό Μέλος
#3
Very interesting Basil, thanks. I didn't know such practice (rotating maqam) was still in use in the particular Jewish tradition. Their 10-mode rotating schedule reminds of the 8-mode rotating schedule of Orthodox churches using Byzantine chant. Also note the parts where everybody joins in at some cadences similar to what happened (and still happens occasionally) in some of the above mentioned churches (remember the Patriarchate and the kids joining in at the cadences). Interesting that there is no isokratema (drone). The style is also familiar to Byzantine psaltai although there are some distinctive differences.
Here is some information about İzak Algazi Efendi, who was a famous Jewish cantor in Turkey and chanted mostly the makam based music. The sound samples have been posted in Zaman Al Wasl forum:

http://www.zamanalwasl.net/forums/showpost.php?p=3759&postcount=10

http://www.zamanalwasl.net/forums/showpost.php?p=3812&postcount=15

http://www.zamanalwasl.net/forums/showpost.php?p=3830&postcount=17

http://www.zamanalwasl.net/forums/showpost.php?p=3833&postcount=18

http://www.zamanalwasl.net/forums/showpost.php?p=3855&postcount=20

http://www.zamanalwasl.net/forums/showpost.php?p=3856&postcount=21
 
Top