Koinonikon for Saturday of Souls

#1
Does anybody have a short, classical version of Μακάριοι οὓς ἐξελέξω καὶ προσελάβου, Κύριε. Καὶ τὸ μνημόσυνον αὐτῶν εἰς γενεὰν καὶ γενεάν. Ἀλληλούϊα.

I have a couple, but they are far too long for the amount of people who will actually attend tomorrow morning. Greek or English would be fine, but I've never seen a classical English piece for this. Much appreciated!
 

romanos4

Παλαιό Μέλος
#2
Sam,

Petros Lampadarios in Plagal 1st - 2 pages long without a kratemata. Perhaps you could make that work?

Can't say I've seen anything shorter.

There's a 6 minute version in English from Papa Ephraim on the St. Anthony's site.

Have a nice liturgy!

As an aside, I was planning to chant the anaphora in Plagal 2nd mode as the mode of the week. Is that sound thinking in your (or anyone's) opinion?

Cheers,

R.
 

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#3
Much appreciated, this is one of the two versions I have. Unfortunately we have such a small crowd for most weekday/Saturday liturgies that this is a bit longer than I need, but I indeed can make it work. Thanks so much.

For the anaphora mode, I may not be the one to ask as I always use Kliton. However, before I adopted this practice, I always matched the mode of the anaphora to the cherubic hymn mode, which I've always matched subsequently to the Koinonikon mode. Since tomorrow is Saturday that gives one the choice of either plagal first or mode of the week. For me, since the Koinonikon is plagal first and I personally like to have the two hymns match, I will use plagal first for the Cherubic hymn, but I imagine your choice of the mode of the week is perfectly acceptable based on The Psaltic taxis Apostolos laid out here.

Unless there is a mode used for this specific service I am unaware of?
 

neoklis

Νεοκλής Λευκόπουλος, Γενικός Συντονιστής
#4
This one by Petros Bereketis is only one page long, (plus two more for the kratima and allilouia).
 

romanos4

Παλαιό Μέλος
#6
I used the Petros score - I chanted it at a somewhat brisk pace and had to improvise at εις γενεαν και γενεαν to complete the hymn in a timely manner but it was mostly good (I think).
 
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