Chourmouzios' revision of Chrysanthos' Eisagoge

#2
Introduction to the New Method of Byzantine Chant Notation: An English translation of Chroumouzios' revision of Chrysanthos' Eisagoge [Paperback]

A new book by Chrysanthos of Madytos (Author), Chourmouzios Chartophylax (Editor), Konstantinos Terzopoulos (Translator)

Follow the link to Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/Introduction-...3114/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1333163688&sr=8-1
Announced here as well. . .
http://analogion.com/forum/showpost.php?p=140568&postcount=1


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saltypsalti

Παλαιό Μέλος
#3
I just purchased a copy of this book, and was generally pleased with its content. Unlike the Great Theory which is couched in language I doubt the clergy know, the Introduction is very succinct and to the point. I do take a small amount of umbrage with the βου ison they propose in 2nd Mode -but minds can disagree on a few things. This books could easily be used a primer for new students, and in fact... it was.

XA
JPP
 

David Walker

Νέο μέλος
#4
I got it in today and just finished it. I like JPP's idea of using it as a primer. It is just straight information and very little application besides examples. I actually like that a lot. It's good to have a concise resource with a smaller scope.

One small setback I could see is that for those with stronger western backgrounds, certain terminologies such as " The diatonic genus...contains only natural tonoi (whole tones)" could be confusing as whole tones in a Western music scale produce the starkly different whole tone scale. Also, the word "voice" is used in the way we would use "pitch." I know this terminology is common in Byzantine theory, but it is unexplained here. This is of course minor, and like any book, it needs a teacher's guidance.

Any other observations/pros/cons you all see?

I also love the 1883 CMC footnotes!
 
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E

emakris

Guest
#5
"The diatonic genus... contains only natural tonoi (whole tones)" could be confusing as whole tones in a Western music scale produce the starkly different whole tone scale.
It is because "tone" doesn't mean "whole tone" but any type of 2nd, larger than a semitone. (There are no real semitones in the diatonic genus).

Also, the word "voice" is used in the way we would use "pitch".
It means actually "step" (ascending or descending 2nd). The size of the interval depends on the scale.
 
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David Walker

Νέο μέλος
#6
Thank you Mr. Makris. I should clarify further. I was comparing the fact that because of its brevity, the Eisagoge does not clarify these terminologies like the Great Theory does directly or indirectly. Even if the GT does not specifically define the term "voice" for example (I can't remember exactly) it is much more detectable by context. The Eisagoge's brevity does not have much time to fully explain.
 
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