Initial Martyria

#1
Hello guys, this is my first post. Greetings! :)

I'm having trouble understanding some of the beginning martyria. (I attached an image below so that you can see what I mean.)

1) Why is the initial martyria of the third mode written with a nana chair (#1 in the file) in some books and with the symbol Γ " + two oligons + kentemata (#2) in other books? I know that the two oligons with kentemata is supposed to mean that the base note of the mode is three steps above Δι. Some psaltai told me that the second version is something that Simon Karas came up with. Is that true? Which one of the two is the more traditional (and most correct) one?

2) When am I supposed to write the martyria of the third mode with a continuous elaphron next to it (#3) and when not?

3) Same goes for Grave Mode. I've seen here two versions too: an oligon + deeplee + grave martyria underneath (#4) and an oligon + kentemata + grave martyria (#5) underneath. Can someone explain to me when to use the one or the other? And again - if this is a martyria that Simon Karas came up with which is the most correct one?

Thanks in advance.

In Christ,
Vlad
 

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#2
Hi Vlad, I'm not an expert, so I don't know the answers to most of your questions, but I can try to give some information on the second one.

"2) When am I supposed to write the martyria of the third mode with a continuous elaphron next to it (#3) and when not?"

This martyrion is used for melodies following the prosomion "Η Πάρθενος Σήμερον" (Today the Virgin) since the base of this hymn, although it is in Third Mode, is set on ΠΑ (by classical melodists). I don't believe it is used otherwise, but perhaps someone with a better background can confirm that.

Panagiotis G.
 

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GabrielCremeens

Music Director at St. George, Albuquerque, NM
#3
Hi Vlad, I'm not an expert, so I don't know the answers to most of your questions, but I can try to give some information on the second one.

"2) When am I supposed to write the martyria of the third mode with a continuous elaphron next to it (#3) and when not?"

This martyrion is used for melodies following the prosomion "Η Πάρθενος Σήμερον" (Today the Virgin) since the base of this hymn, although it is in Third Mode, is set on ΠΑ (by classical melodists). I don't believe it is used otherwise, but perhaps someone with a better background can confirm that.

Panagiotis G.
Sometimes it's simply used to indicate that the note of a previous melodic line ended on Pa.

For instance, verses in 3rd mode (both heirmologic and sticheraric) end on Pa. However, this verse might not always be written. So, to remind the chanter that the melody will be beginning from the note Pa (of the previous implied verse), the 3rd Mode initial martyria from Ga will be paired with a syneches elaphron indicating that descent to Pa from which the piece will be beginning.